Kenyan Nurse Lucy Chege Renounces Citizenship 16 Years After Moving to US

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Lucy Chege, a Master’s Degree holder who has been living in the United States for the last 16 years, is no longer a Kenyan citizen.

The nurse joined 29 other foreigners drawn from nine countries who swore an oath of allegiance to the U.S. Constitution at an event held at César E. Chávez National Monument in Keene on Friday.

A report by the Bakersfield Californian, one of Kern County’s oldest newspapers, indicated that one of the conditions for her to be granted US Citizenship was for her to renounce her mother country, Kenya.

The event was headed by W. Patrick Lujan, acting director of the Fresno Field Office of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services who awarded the 30 individuals with the US Citizenships.

30 foreigners take oath before receiving the certificate of US Citizenship at Keene.

Photo

Bakersfield.com

The event began with taking an oath.

“I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen, so help me God,” the 30 stated as a chorus.

After the successful exercise, Lujan formally welcomed the group to the United States where they will be recognised as citizens for the rest of their lives.

“On behalf of the United States Immigration and Citizenship Services, we’re honored to welcome you as our newest citizens of the United States,” he told them.

Speaking to the outlet, Chege confirmed that she was no longer a Kenyan Citizen.

“I’m no longer a Kenyan. It’s not an easy thing,” she explained, according to Bakersfield Californian.

In an interview with a different outlet, the nurse expressed her joy of finally securing the citizenship of a country she had lived in for more than 16 years.

 She first moved to the US in 2007 to pursue university education. She later graduated with a Master’s degree in Public Health.

“I’m a nurse by profession. I got my Masters in Public Health, and now, I’m a U.S. citizen,” she revealed.

“It’s surreal. It’s–it’s, I don’t know how to explain it. You’re kind of in a new family, but there’s a family that you know. I’m happy that I get to do this and that the U.S. gets to give us this opportunity.”

Lucy Chege in an interview with ABC 23 in Kern County.

Photo

ABC 23



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