Police Block News Conference Fronted to Expose Atrocities by British Troops


The police on Monday blocked a press conference called to air allegations of human rights and environmental abuses by British troops in the country hours before King Charles III’s arrival in the country.

According to Reuters, police arrived at the scene in a lorry and two smaller trucks and blocked access points to the venue before the meeting’s conveners could hold the press conference.

Per the report, the police then proceeded to seek out the hotel’s management warning them against hosting the event.

Police officers walking along Kenyatta Avenue in June 2022.

Photo

NPS

For years, Kenyans have accused British soldiers training in Laikipia of human rights violations.

In August, a Parliamentary Committee launched investigations into alleged human rights violations and ethical breaches by a British army training unit.

This followed numerous complaints from Kenyans pointing to harassment by the soldiers. Residents also complained of environmental degradation by the foreign troops.

The most recent high-profile capturing this in a nutshell is the case of Agnes Wanjiru who was allegedly killed by a British soldier and her body dumped in a septic tank.

Wanjiru, who was 21 at the time of her death had last been seen alive with British troops at a hotel in Nanyuki in March 2012 before her mutilated body was found 3 months later near a British military camp.

Following the case, British authorities commenced investigations into the case, although the soldier’s name was concealed. He was only identified as Soldier X.

General Mark Carleton-Smith, the then head of the British army in October 2021 said that the British government would support Kenyan authorities to investigate the matter.

At the time, Smith said the priority was to establish facts as quickly as possible.

Meanwhile, British media outlets have reported that the soldier is living and walking scot-free in South England.

Photo of Agnes Wanjiru

Photo

The Independent





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